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H H S Department of Health and Human Services
Health Resources and Services Administration
Maternal and Child Health

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Programs A-Z

A

Adequate Insurance and Financing
Serving Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN), their families and the providers that serve them, the program collects, interprets and integrates valid and applicable evidence related to the implementation and monitoring of each of the six core components of community-based systems of care: family/ professional partnerships at all levels of decision-making; access to comprehensive health and related services through the medical home; early and continuous screening, evaluation and diagnosis; adequate public and/or private financing of needed services; organization of community services so that families can use them easily; and successful transition to all aspects of adult health care, work, and independence. The National Center on Health Insurance and Financing improves health care coverage and financing for CSHCN.

 Adolescent and Young Adult Health Program
The Adolescent and Young Adult Health Program aims to improve the comprehensive health, development, safety, and social and emotional well-being of adolescents and young adults in the United States. Young people represent developmental transitions between childhood and full-fledged adulthood; frequently engage in behaviors that jeopardize their current health and safety and increase the risk for adult chronic disease; and have relatively poor access to health care, especially services that are developmentally appropriate, effective and acceptable. The Adolescent and Young Adult Health Program has a broad audience that includes the professionals, administrators, state and community officials, and other decision-makers who either serve, or influence the health, safety and well-being of, young people between the ages of 10 and 24 years. For more information, see the Adolescent and Young Adult Health Program.

Alliance for Information on Maternal and Child Health (AIM)
The Alliance for Information on Maternal and Child Health (AIM) is a collaborative of national professional membership organizations and the MCHB. The goal of this program is to help members of these organizations make well-informed decisions affecting public health policies and programs for women, children and families. Current grantees include National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and National Institute for Health Care Management (NIHCM), among others.

Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities
For additional information, see Combating Autism.

MCH Autism Intervention Research Program
The purpose of the MCH Autism Intervention Research Program is to support research (both primary data collection and secondary data analysis) on evidence-based practices for interventions to improve the health and wellbeing of children and adolescents with ASD and other developmental disabilities.  Consistent with HRSA’s mission as the access agency to provide services to underserved populations, the MCH Autism Intervention Research Program supports research that address the needs of underserved populations affected by autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities, as well as barriers to receipt of interventions. 

Autism Intervention Research Networks
The Autism Intervention Research Networks on Behavioral Health (AIR-B Network) and Physical Health (AIR-P Network) advance the critical knowledge base on evidence-based practices for interventions to improve the behavioral and physical health of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities.  These Networks conduct multi-site research studies, develop evidence-based guidelines and disseminate critical information on findings to providers and the public including families. For more information, see The Autism Intervention Research Networks on Behavioral Health (AIR-B Network), Physical Health (AIR-P Network) and MCH Research Projects.

Autism in the Integrated Services Branch
Combating Autism activities, in response to the Combating Autism Act of 2006, are designed to serve all infants, children and adolescents who have, or are at risk for developing, Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) and other developmental disabilities.  The purpose of this program is help enable this population to reach their full potential by developing a system of services that includes screening children early for possible ASDs and other developmental disorders; conducting early, interdisciplinary, evaluations to confirm or rule out ASDs and other developmental disorders; and providing evidence-based, early interventions when a diagnosis is confirmed.  State Implementation Grants and State Planning Grants for Improving Services for Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and other Developmental Disabilities are designed to improve access to comprehensive, coordinated health care and related services that are culturally appropriate and family-centered for children and youth with ASD and other developmental disabilities. An evaluation component, a coordinating technical assistance center and other MCHB Autism program work closely with these grantees. These programs are important because (ASDs) are lifelong developmental disabilities, characterized by marked difficulties in social interaction, communication skills, and restricted, repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior, interests and activity.  The increased number of children and adults diagnosed with ASD ( 1 in 91 children 3-17) is a growing and urgent concern for families, service providers, and policy-makers, as the nation’s existing health, education, and social service systems struggle to respond to the service needs of this population in a comprehensive manner.

B

 Blood Disorders
The Genetic Services Branch integrates genetic services into community systems of care. The Sickle Cell Disease Programs and Thalassemia Program are designed to enhance services of medical management, counseling, education, prevention and treatment; train health professionals/providers in the care of individuals with blood disorders; enter into partnerships with family community based organizations, adult & pediatric hematologists and other regional experts in blood disorder. The programs are important for their models of quality care and education and counseling to individuals identified with blood disorders and their families.

Block Grants
See Title V Block Grants to States.

 Body Works- Healthy Weight
The Innovative Approaches to Healthy Weight discretionary grant program serves young and adult women in 10 communities. Within each three-year grant, community-based programs assess the needs of women in their community with respect to attaining and maintaining a healthy weight; develop programs to achieve a healthy weight; and, report their progress and findings to their community and to HRSA for replication. The overweight and obesity crisis in America continues to increase and threaten the health of our nation. Overweight and obesity is particularly prevalent among post-partum women and women of reproductive age. MCHB is tasked with serving and promoting the health of all women in the nation; MCHB's programs will benefit from the knowledge gained from the Healthy Weight demonstration program.

 Breast Cancer (young women)
Authorized by the Affordable Care Act, the purpose of the Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women is to provide advice and guidance to the Secretary, HHS, the Assistant Secretary for Health, and the Director, CDC, regarding implementation and evaluation of evidence-based activities designed to prevent breast cancer and promote the early detection and support of young women who develop the disease.  The HRSA Office of Women’s Health is the HRSA representative for this committee serving in an advisory role to provide guidance in increasing awareness of issues that impact women and girls. For more information, see the Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women.

 Breastfeeding
The Business Case for Breastfeeding Train-the-Trainer program instructs state lactation consultants and Healthy Start communities on the effective use of the resource kit to increase the availability of work site lactation support. The Business Case for Breastfeeding is a relatively new resource kit to promote breastfeeding and lactation support in the work site.  Promotion of work site lactation support is important to meet the Healthy People 2020 goals on breast feeding initiation and duration, particularly among vulnerable populations. For more information, see the Business Case for Breastfeeding

Bright Futures for Infants, Children, and Adolescents
Bright Futures is the Maternal and Child Health Bureau’s longstanding partnership with the American Academy of Pediatrics to improve the quality of health promotion and preventive services for infants, children and adolescents and to respond to their current and emerging health needs.  For more information, see Bright Futures. exit disclaimer See also TXT4Tots, a library of short messages on nutrition and physical activity for parents and caregivers of 1- to 5-year-olds based on the Bright Futures guidelines.

Bright Futures for Women’s Health and Wellness Bright Futures for Women’s Health and Wellness is an initiative to plan, develop, implement, and evaluate a variety of evidence-based, culturally competent consumer, healthcare provider, and community products that will increase women’s awareness and use of preventive health services. The goals are to increase the use of preventive services, empower women to share in health care decision-making, encourage women to practice prevention in their daily lives, increase practitioner utilization of preventive health guidelines and support community-wide health promotion. For more information, see  HRSA’s Office of Women’s Health.

Bullying
See Stop Bullying.

C

Caregiver Services
As the U.S. population ages, care giving has become increasingly important.  Women are often the primary caregivers for children and the elderly. HRSA’s Office of Women’s Health developed a podcast titled, Caregivers Count! Support for Women and Families with Special Needs Children. The podcast provides listeners with information on services and resources available for caregivers with special needs children. Listen to the podcast.

Child Death Review
The MCH National Child Death Review Policy and Resource Center improves and strengthens State and local capacity to perform Child Death Reviews and to use information from those reviews to improve child and adolescent health services and systems and, ultimately, the health status of children and adolescents. For more information, see MCH National Child Death Review Policy and Resource Center.

Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN)
CSHCN are defined as “those children who have or are at increased risk for a chronic physical, developmental, behavioral, or emotional condition and who also require health and related services of a type or amount beyond that required by children generally” (American Academy of Pediatrics, 1998). We include youth when referencing CSHCN. 

Children’s Safety Network
The Safety Promotion and Injury & Violence Prevention programs serve the state and local MCH organizations, related public health, education, and safety organizations, and other youth-serving professionals and administrators with injury and violence prevention. Its goal is to improve infant, child and adolescent health and safety service and systems through two cooperative agreements. The Children’s Safety Network National Resource Centerassists states and localities to plan, implement, strengthen and evaluate injury and violence prevention programs that will improve health services delivery and risk reduction, as well as public health and safety. The MCH National Child Death Review Policy and Resource Center improves and strengthens State and local capacity to perform Child Death Reviews and to use information from those reviews to improve child and adolescent health services and systems and, ultimately, the health status of children and adolescents. Injuries are the leading public health threat facing people aged 1-44 years today.  More children and adolescents die from injuries and violence than all diseases combined, and injuries are the leading cause of disability. Through their work in safety promotion, the programs help protect infants, children, adolescents and families from this threat.

Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
CHIP is a public insurance program that provides medical assistance to enrollees that meet eligibility requirements. See Partnerships with State Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Communication Disorders
The MCH Communication Disorders Training Programs train speech-language pathologists and audiologists to provide comprehensive services to children and their families, and promotes the advancement of the field through information and knowledge dissemination.  Training focuses on leadership in communication disorders through: graduate training of speech/language pathologists and audiologists for leadership roles in education, service, research, academia, administration, and advocacy; development and dissemination of curricula, teaching models, and other educational resources to enhance MCH content in communication disorders training programs; and, continuing education, consultation and technical assistance geared to the needs of the MCH community. For more information, see MCH Training.

Community Integrated Services
One of the most frustrating aspects of the service system for families and of CYSHCN is the complexity and fragmentation of services at the community level.  Multiple programs, each with their own eligibility requirements, policies, procedures and funding serve children and youth with special health care needs.  While national survey data indicates that families are fairly satisfied with services in their community, disparities exist across age, race/ethnicity and communities.  This program funds a National Center on Community Based Servicesdesigned to support states and communities, and to develop the leadership and capacity to provide organized, easy to use community services for families of children and youth with special health care needs.   

Cultural and Linguistic Competence
Core values across all MCH programs include family-centered care, family/professional partnerships and cultural and linguistic competence and are integrated throughout Bureau policies and activities. The purpose of the Cultural And Linguistic Competence program is to increase the capacity of health care and mental health care programs and family advocates to design, implement, and evaluate culturally and linguistically competent service delivery and support systems. This program serves CSHCN/MCHB programs, including SIDS/OID programs and their partners, communities and key stakeholders such as families and youth with special health care needs through the National Center for Cultural Competence.  This program is important because it addresses growing diversity and demographic changes, persistent disparities, health literacy issues, health and mental health inequities for underserved populations and translates evidence into policy and practice.For more information, see Cultural And Linguistic Competence.

D

Data Resource Center
Supported by HRSA MCHB, the purpose of the Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health (DRC) is to advance the effective use of public data on the health and health-related services for children, youth and families in the United States. For more information, see Data Resource Center for Child and Adolescent Health

Data to Practice
The Office of Epidemiology, Policy, and Evaluation (OEPE) provides national leadership in the advancement and utilization of scientific knowledge to inform maternal and child health policy, programs and public health practices for enhancing the health and well-being of women, children and families.  The OEPE utilizes various strategies for providing data that can be used by program managers and policy makers to design effective practices. For more information, see Data to Practice progam.

Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics
The Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics Program enhances the behavioral, psychosocial, and developmental aspects of general pediatric care. The programs support fellows in behavioral pediatrics to help prepare them for leadership roles as teachers, researchers, and clinicians.  For more information, see MCH Training Programs.

Discretionary Grant Information System
The Discretionary Grant Information System (DGIS) provides financial, performance, and demographic information for 80 MCHB-funded grantees.  The information displayed in the DGIS provides important information for grantees, maternal and child health (MCH) professionals, and interested members of the public on how grant funds are used to support MCH populations and services.  The data also demonstrates performance improvements of grantees over time. For more information, seethe Discretionary Grant Information System.

Distance Learning
The MCH Training Program's distance education efforts enhance the reach of traditional continuing education offerings through videoconferencing, satellite linkages and the web.  MCH funded Distance Learning Grants provide effective and efficient means by which maternal and child health (MCH) professionals can enhance and advance their analytical, managerial, administrative, and clinical skills while continuing to meet their daily on-site responsibilities. Projects provide continuing education on diverse MCH topics to a regional and/or national audience. For more information, see the Distance Learning program.

Domestic Violence
Domestic violence can happen to anyone regardless of race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. Domestic violence affects people of all socioeconomic backgrounds and education levels. Domestic violence occurs in both opposite-sex and same-sex relationships and can happen to intimate partners who are married, living together, or dating.”  The HRSA Office of Women’s Health in collaboration with the HRSA Women’s Health Coordinating Committee Violence Prevention Workgroup and the HRSA Learning Institute developed priorities to address violence prevention. One priority currently been addressed is the revision of the HRSA Violence in the Workplace policy and the need to provide training to all HRSA employees. Other priorities include raising awareness of violence through participation on advisory committees and planning and coordinating webinars and webcasts. For more information, please visit the U.S. Department of Justice.

Doula Program
The Doula Program serves pregnant and post-partum women in three rural and three urban communities in the US. The Doula Leadership Institute provides training to community-based doulas in the six discretionary grant sites.  The purpose of the discretionary Doula program is to improve birth outcomes through the provision of perinatal education and support by community-base doulas. The HRSA Community-based Doula (Doula) program identifies and trains indigenous community leaders to mentor pregnant women during the months of pregnancy, birth and the immediate post-partum period.  Doulas provide culturally sensitive pregnancy and childbirth education, early linkage to health care and social services, labor coaching, breastfeeding education and counseling and parenting skills while fostering parental attachment. The US has unacceptably high rates of infant mortality, low birth weight, preterm delivery, cesarean section and other preventable pregnancy-related outcomes. Research indicates that women cared for during labor by a birth doula, compared to those receiving usual care were:

  • 26% less likely to give birth by cesarean section
  • 41% less likely to give birth with a vacuum extractor of forceps
  • 28% less likely to use any analgesia or anesthesia, and
  • 33% less likely to be dissatisfied or negatively rate their birth experience

A link between the pregnant mother’s emotional state and her infant’s subsequent emotional well-being and behavior implies that intervention by doulas during the pregnancies of vulnerable women may have positive outcomes for their children’s development.

E

Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems (ECCS)
Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems grants help states and communities to build and integrate early childhood service systems that better meet the needs of children and families. Since 2003, 49 States, the District of Columbia, Guam, the Republic of Palau and the commonwealths of Puerto Rico and the Mariana Islands have participated in the program. See Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems website.

Early Childhood Programs
The Early Childhood Programs in HRSA/MCHB support the vision of a comprehensive, high-quality early childhood system that promotes maternal, infant, and early childhood health, safety, and development, as well as strong parent-child relationships. The Early Childhood programs support federal, state, and local agencies, through collaborative efforts, to effect changes that will improve the health and well-being of young children and their families by addressing healthy child development within the framework of life course development and a socio-ecological perspective. For more information, see Early Childhood programs.

Early Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT)
EPSDT is the child health component of Medicaid. It's required in every state and is designed to improve the health of low-income children, by financing appropriate and necessary pediatric services. See EPSDT & Title V Collaboration to Improve Child Health.

Emergency Medical Services for Children Program (EMSC)
The EMSC Program works in partnership with States, territories, the District, communities, medical institutions, public-private partners, and families to enhance the pediatric capability of EMS systems to include the areas of:  prevention, pre-hospital EMS care, hospital-based care, rehabilitation and reentry of the child into the community.  Improve the delivery and quality of medical care across the country available and accessible to all children whenever needed.  The Program is focusing on key components of state, territorial and district EMS systems to improve the operational capacity to manage and treat the emergency medical needs of children.  The EMSC Program works in partnership to assure that EMS personnel are trained, EMS system services are equipped with pediatric equipment for EMS services to safely and effectively manage and treat pediatric patients while en route to a medical facility.  The Program evolved out of a growing recognition that children have unique needs in emergency situations; needs that often vary from those of adults due to physiological, developmental, and psychological differences. For more information, see the EMSC program.

Epidemiology Writing Program
In an effort to strengthen the evidence base in MCH, particularly for evidence of program effectiveness at the state and local level, we offer assistance to state and local MCH health department staff who would like to write a scientific manuscript for publication. This assistance can be in the form of helping write the manuscript or assisting with the analysis of the data.

Epilepsy
The Epilepsy Program serves Children and Youth with Epilepsy (CYE) and/or seizure disorder. The Epilepsy program works to improve access and increase awareness to comprehensive, coordinated health care and other services for culturally and linguistically diverse children and youth with epilepsy (CYE) residing in medically underserved areas and rural areas.  This is achieved by funding two sets of grantees: Innovative Strategies and Promising Practice (IS/PP) and Telehealth Services for CYE; and funding a national epilepsy center, the National Center for Project Access.  The IS/PP grantees utilize a promising practice and/or strategy in their respective States/regions in improving awareness and decreasing stigma around epilepsy.  The primary objective of the Telehealth Services for CYE program is to demonstrate the utility of telehealth programs and networks in achieving optimal care for CYE.  The National Center for Project Access provides national leadership to both sets of grantees; Epilepsy Foundation affiliates; and work alongside other DSCHCN National Centers in increasing awareness on epilepsy care.   This program is important because it brings awareness to the condition and the stigma and resulting depression it brings, awareness about the need for specialists and provides information and support to providers and families about treatment alternatives and enabling services. For more information, see the Epilepsy program.

F

Family/Professional Partnerships Program
The Family/Professional Partnerships program serves children and youth with special health care needs, their families and the providers and programs that serve them.  The purpose is to promote family-centered care through partnerships between families with CYSHCN and health professionals and policy makers to improve the quality of life for CSHCN and their families as well as that of the health care delivery system. This program supports the National Center for Family/Professional Partnerships (NCFPP) which provides leadership on implementing the core component of a system of care for children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) – families will partner in decision-making at all levels and state grants in the form of F2F HICs. The NCFPP accomplishes this outcome by: 1) leading national "community of family learners and mentors" including Family-to-Family Health Information Centers (F2F HICs) and state Family Voices Networks through peer mentoring, training and technical assistance (TA);  2) providing leadership in advancing family/professional partnerships through the development and dissemination of evidence based information and training materials; and 3) supporting an active youth component, Kids As Self Advocates (KASA), a national grassroots network of youth with disabilities that educates around and supports the development of youth as self advocates. Family to Family Health Information Centers (F2F HICs) were established in all 50 States and the District of Columbia by the Family Opportunity Act/Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 and was extended by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 through fiscal year 2012. These Centers are unique in that they are staffed/run by trained family leaders and assist families in making informed decisions about health care in order to promote good treatment decisions, cost-effectiveness, and improved health outcomes for such children. This program is important because studies show that family participation and family-centered providers are associated with improved transition, less unmet needs, better community based systems, and fewer problems with specialty referrals and family-centered care based upon family/professional partnerships is a standard of practice which results in high quality services.

Family to Family
The Family to Family Health Information Centers (F2F HICs) grant program was originally established by the Family Opportunity Act (FOA) as a part of the Budget Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (P.L. 109-171. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 extended the F2F HICs through fiscal year 2012.  This initiative supports grants to assure that families of children with special healthcare needs (CSHCN) will participate in decision making at all levels and will be satisfied with the services they receive. For more information, see the Family to Family program.

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum
The FASD set aside cooperative agreement provides training and technical assistance to obstetric and pediatric providers on identification and support for families affected by FASD.For the past six years, the Children’s Research Triangle, in partnership with the National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, has been funded by MCHB to develop and deliver a series of training and technical assistance (TA) programs in community health centers (CHC) and maternal and child health (MCH) sites around the country. CHC and MCH grantees serve those who engage in risky drinking and are at high risk for FASD. The purpose of the Project is to prevent FASD and provide the opportunity for early intervention for women and their children affected by alcohol use.  The specific aim is to provide training and TA for CHCs and MCH sites that impact clinical practice in three arenas: prevention; identification; and support.  With an incidence rate of approximately 1 in 1000 live births, Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is one of the nation’s most detrimental and completely preventable birth defects. Annually, approximately 4 million infants are born with prenatal alcohol exposure and 1,000 to 4,000 with FAS. FAS is a permanent condition that causes one or more disabilities including problems with learning, memory, attention span, communication, vision, and/or hearing; it affects every aspect of an individual’s and their family’s life.

Fetal and Infant Mortality Review
The National Fetal and Infant Mortality Resource Center (NFIMR) provides expert technical assistance (TA) to States, Healthy Start and other communities as they develop and implement community-based fetal and infant mortality review (FIMR) processes. NFIMR TA and training for local FIMR programs is tailored to the community’s needs and may include: 1.) the newest information about FIMR best practices, lessons learned and methodology; 2.) strategies and best practices for coordinating different types of mortality reviews; 3.) standardized, updated data abstraction forms and accompanying software to collect and analyze local case data and team recommendations; 4.) links to other local FIMR programs (the NFIMR Program Directory) with similar backgrounds or geographic locations to network and mentor; and, 5.) support for linking to other MCHB-funded programs (e.g., Child Death Review; Healthy Start; Title V; CityMatCH) to apply systems-improvement findings. The FIMR process is a highly effective strategy to reduce infant and maternal mortality and morbidity.

First-time Motherhood

The First Time Motherhood/New Parents Initiative provides funding to states to develop, implement, and evaluate novel social marketing approaches aimed at increasing awareness of existing preconception/interconception, prenatal care, and parenting services for new parents.  The grant funds allow states to disseminate information about ongoing social services that assist men and women in understanding their role as new and expectant parents. Targeted social marketing campaigns have been shown to raise awareness of services to meet the needs of new parents. The goal of the program, which serves women, men, infants, adolescents, is to raise awareness about preconception/interconception, prenatal, and parenting services available within the state through the use of innovative social marketing techniques. 

G

Genetic Services
Genetics is the branch of medicine that looks at how hereditary and genetic factors play a role in causing or preventing a health problem, such as cancer or heart disease. Genetic services include direct clinical care services as well as activities such as prenatal, newborn or other screening programs, laboratory services, educational and training activities and birth defects surveillance. The goals of delivering genetic services are to identify the underlying cause of medical concerns to aid in timely treatment, health promotion and disease prevention, maximizing patient potential and educating families and individuals and health professionals. For more information, see the Genetic Services program

Genetics Training
See Training, Genetics Training

H

Health Insurance and Financing
Health insurance and financing plays a critical role in assuring appropriate access to care for children with special health care needs. While almost 60% of CSHCN nationally meet the health insurance core outcome, significant disparities still exist based on poverty race/ethnicity and functional ability The Health Insurance and Financing Program focuses on three key strategies to improve access to adequate health insurance and financing:  1) expand insurance to include uninsured CYSHCN; 2) close the benefit gaps and assure that CYSHCN have access to needed benefits and services, including those not financed through health insurance; and 3) improve the financing and reimbursement of services.  With the passage of the Affordable Care Act, the focus of the program will be on assuring that health care reform meets the needs of CYSHCN and their families. This program supports a National Center dedicated to improving health insurance and financing for CYSHCN.

Healthy Child Care America Program
Healthy Child Care America programs promote improving children’s health and safety in child care and early education programs where a majority of U.S. children under the age of six spend their day. The three HCCA programs are: 1. National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education. Home of national health and safety standards; health, nutrition and safety resources for parents/families, child care providers, state regulators; database of states’/territories’ child care regulations. 2. National Training Institute for Child Care Health Consultants. A national training program and resources for  trainers of Child Care Health Consultants who work with child care programs to improve their health and safety practices and policies. 3. Child Care and Health Partnership. A collaborative effort of health professionals and child care providers working to improve children in child care’s health and safety and improve children’s access to medical homes and insurance. The Healthy Child Care America programs should also be mentioned as one of the  MCHB programs that disseminates information related to children in child care and early education in the broader topics of: Families, Infant and Child Health, Medical Home, Nutrition, Oral Health, Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs, Injury Prevention, Early Childhood Programs.

Healthy Start
Healthy Start grants serve pregnant, postpartum, and interconceptional women, their infants, and families who are at the highest risk for adverse maternal and infant outcomes. Healthy Start is in 104 communities across 38 States, D.C. and Puerto Rico. Every Healthy Start (HS) community focuses on reducing infant mortality and eliminating disparities in perinatal infant, women’s and maternal health (Healthy Start target population)by: enhancing a community's health care infrastructure and service system; strengthening the respective State health care infrastructure and response to the health-related needs of the HS target population; and directing resources and interventions to improve awareness of, access to, utilization of, and full participation in comprehensive perinatal and women's health services, particularly for women and infants at higher risk for poor health outcomes.  Located in high risk urban cities and rural counties, every Healthy Start project implements community-driven approaches to address high infant mortality rates by reducing maternal behavioral and medical risk factors and promoting life-long healthy outcomes for women and their families.  Beginning with preconception or prenatal care and continuing through two years after pregnancy, each funded community assures the availability of a core set of services and activities for the perinatal population in their project area. These services include case management; health education; home visiting and links to health care and other needed services for mothers and their infants; direct outreach and peer mentoring by trained community members; screening and referral for perinatal/postpartum depression; and strong coordination with and access to early identification and intervention for substance abuse (tobacco, alcohol, illicit substance use), domestic and family violence, mental health,  parenting skill building and other critical services for high-risk women and families. In addition, each Healthy Start project is required to: have a community-based consortium composed of women and families served by the project as well as individuals and organizations in the target community that have a committed interest in the health and wellbeing of the Healthy Start target population; actively collaborate with their State Title V Maternal and Child Health Agency; support a program evaluation; and, implement a local health system action plan to improve the quality, cultural competence of and access to necessary services for the Healthy Start target population and/or to identify and collaboratively address existing barriers to the quality and effectiveness of the local system of care.  Most importantly, each Healthy Start project works with the women they serve to ensure that they can bring their voices as consumers of services to the table at the policy level for the project and within their communities. The US has unacceptably high rates of infant mortality, low birth weight, preterm delivery, and other preventable adverse maternal and infant health outcomes. The U.S. ranks 33rd in infant mortality among other industrialized nations. In contrast, while the nation's infant mortality rate (IMR) in 2007 was 6.75 infant deaths per 1,000 live births, the IMR among HS participants was 5.1 infant deaths per 1,000 live births. For more information, see Healthy Start.

Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children
The Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program (HTPCP) aims to stimulate the development of community-based health initiatives in areas where identified child health needs are not being met. HTPCP awards grants of approximately $50,000 per year for a five-year project period. This program promotes prevention efforts and increased access to health services for pregnant women, infants, children and youth by funding projects that support a new, direct service health initiative or a new component of an existing initiative; pediatrician involvement; a realistic and well-planned program evaluation; advisory board oversight with involvement from families and local community members, and collaboration with state and local agencies.  Projects supported by HTPCP are excellent examples of innovative and cost-effective approaches that leverage federal and non-federal resources to address community identified child health and developmental needs in vulnerable children and their families. For more information, see the Healthy Tomorrows Partnership

Healthy Weight
See Bright Futures for Women's Health and Wellness.

Hemophilia
The Hemophilia Program serves individuals with hemophilia and other bleeding disorders and their families by helping to provide comprehensive, coordinated care through an integrated regional network of centers. The purpose of this program is to support the diagnosis and treatment of hemophilia and other bleeding disorders using a comprehensive care model to provide quality care and appropriate hematologic, genetic, and other subspecialty expertise, services, and technology that providers, patients, and their families need to manage bleeding disorders across the life course. This long-standing program is important in continuing outreach to unserved and underserved people with bleeding disorders and ensuring that patients receives medical, psycho-social, and peer support, and genetic counseling throughout their lifetime, including the transition from pediatric to adult care. For more information, see the Hemophilia program.

Home Visiting
Authorized by the Affordable Care Act, the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program responds to the diverse needs of children and families in communities at risk and provides an unprecedented opportunity for collaboration and partnership at the Federal, State, and community levels to improve health and development outcomes for at-risk children through evidence-based home visiting programs. Through the MIECHV Program, nurses, social workers, or other professionals meet with at-risk families in the family homes to evaluate the families’ circumstances and connect families to the kinds of help that can make a real difference in a child’s health, development, and ability to learn. These recommendations may include additional Health care, developmental services for children, early education, parenting skills, child abuse prevention, and nutrition education or assistance. HRSA’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau is working closely with the Administration on Children and Families to make this program a success and to provide an example of how evidence-based policy and effective collaboration, among Federal agencies, between States and the Federal government, and across local programs, can improve outcomes.  The program is authorized to provide grants to States for $1.5 billion over 5 years:  $100 million for FY 2010; $250 million for FY 2011; $350 million for FY 2012; $400 million for FY 2013; and $400 million for FY 2014.The MIECHV Program will provide funding during Federal fiscal years 2010 – 2014 for State home visiting programs, subject to the condition that the State gives service priority to families residing in at-risk communities identified by a required statewide needs assessment. For more information, see the Home Visiting program.

I

Immunization
See Bright Futures

Incarcerated Women
Incarcerated women are frequently released back into their communities without plans for their health care and social service needs. HRSA’s Office of Women’s Health is working with other Federal and non-Federal partners to raise awareness of the needs of newly released women and provide for their seamless transition back into their communities.  In addition, HRSA’s HIV/AIDS Bureau funds the Special Projects of National Significance (SPNS) - Enhancing Linkages to HIV Primary Care and Services in Jail Settings Initiative to design, implement and evaluate innovative methods for linking persons living with HIV/AIDS who are incarcerated or have been recently released from local jail facilities to primary medical care and ancillary services. For more information, see Enhancing Linkages to HIV Primary Care and Services in Jail Settings Initiative.

Infant and Child Health
See Healthy Child Care America, Healthy Start and Bright Futures.

Injury Prevention
The Injury Prevention program promotes infant, child and adolescent safety through training and technical assistance to States and other organizations. It assures that the appropriate evidence-based resources are available to end users for application in prevention efforts throughout their diverse environments. For more information, see Injury Prevention program.

Insure Kids Now
The Insure Kids (IKN) hotline provides families of uninsured children an easy way to learn how to apply for free or low-cost health care.  When callers phone (877) KIDS-NOW they are automatically connected to their respective State agency for applying for Medicaid and CHIP health benefits. For more information, see Insure Kids Now.

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Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH)
The Leadership Education in Adolescent Health program provides interdisciplinary training for physicians, psychologists, nurses, social workers, and nutritionists. See MCH Training Grantee Network.

Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND)
Trains future leaders in a variety of disciplines to improve the health of children who have or are at risk of developing neurodevelopmental disabilities or other similar conditions such as autism and intellectual disabilities.  For more information, see MCH Training.

Leadership Education in Pediatric Dentistry
The purpose of these grants is to provide a national focus on leadership training in pediatric dentistry through the support of (1) postdoctoral training of dentists in the primary care specialty of pediatric dentistry for leadership roles in education, research, public health administration, advocacy and public service related to oral health programs for populations of mothers and children (infants through adolescents), particularly children with special health care needs and the Head Start population; (2) development and dissemination of curricula, teaching models, and other educational resources to enhance MCH oral health programs; and (3) continuing education, consultation and technical assistance in pediatric oral health which address the needs of the MCH community, including Head Start. See Also Training

Learning Collaboratives
The challenge of improving access to quality care for the populations served by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) calls for innovative solutions.  By using the Learning Collaborative model developed by the Institute for Health Improvement (IHI), MCHB’s Division of Services for Children with Special Health Care Needs (DSCSHN) has supported activities to systematically improve access to care, especially through the medical home model, engaged families and enhanced community and state initiatives.  Multi-stakeholder teams, working together over a period of time, test, share and implement evidence based strategies.  Teams track their progress in meeting program measures by entering data in a password protected on-line website. For more information, see Learning Collaboratives.

LGBT Populations
Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations are part of all our communities across the United States. LGBT populations often experience challenges with accessing health and other services, and being included in program planning and research discussions.  HRSA, in collaboration with other Federal and non-Federal organizations, is committed to eliminating disparities for LGBT populations through innovative partnerships including anti-bullying programs.  For more information, visit the HHS website, The CDC website and Stop Bullying.

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Maternal Health Initiative

MCH Certificate Programs
MCHB supports two MCH Certificate programs which help key State Title V personnel and partners to facilitate timely transfer of new information, research findings, and technology related to MCH; and update and improve the knowledge and skills of health and related professionals in programs serving mothers and children. These programs support the conduct of short-term, non-degree related courses, symposia, institutes, and distance learning strategies for the MCH population.See Also Training

MCH Epidemiology Training Course
The MCH Epidemiology Training Course is an annual 3-5 day in-person course with some online lectures.It is usually given in May or June. It is targeted primarily for MCH staff in state and local health departments. The course alternates between being at a beginner-intermediate level and an intermediate-advanced level.The course covers topics such as program evaluation, needs assessment, small area analysis, trend analysis, multivariate analysis, and multi-level modeling.

MCH Pipeline
The MCH Pipeline Programs promote the development of a culturally diverse and representative health care workforce by recruiting, training, and retaining students from under-represented groups into maternal and child public health professions.  MCH Pipeline programs recruit financially disadvantaged, under-represented undergraduate students and provides enriching experiences to increase students’ interests in MCH public health professions.  See Also Training

MCH Public Health Leadership Institute
The MCH Public Health Leadership Institute provides training to increase the leadership skills of key management personnel in State Title V Maternal and Child Health and Children with Special Health Care Needs programs in the U.S.  This executive-education program is designed to quickly build practical skills for effectively leading, managing people, and building partnerships, to advocate for and create the MCH systems of tomorrow. For more information, see the MCH Public Health Leadership Institute.

MCH Research

MCH Secondary Data Analysis Studies (SDAS)
The R40 SDAS Program supports applied research relating to maternal and child health services that utilize exclusively the analysis of existing secondary data.  The goal of the SDAS Program is to make use of existing secondary MCH datasets for analysis to advance the knowledge base and improve health services and care for MCH populations. For more information, see MCH Research.

Pediatric Research in Office Settings (PROS) Network
The PROS Network, a national practice-based research network, was established more than 20 years ago as a partnership between the MCH Research Program and the American Academy of Pediatrics.  The mission of PROS is to improve the health of children and enhance primary care practice by conducting national collaborative practice-based research that will generate and develop knowledge essential to maintaining and advancing the health of the pediatric population.  This pioneering national network leveraged $3.5 million to develop an EHR network (ePROS) for comparative effectiveness research in 2010. For more information, see the The PROS Network and MCH Research.

Pediatric Primary Care Electronic Health Record (EHR) Network for Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER)
The Pediatric Electronic Health Record Network conducts comparative effectiveness research (CER) in pediatric primary care sites around the United States through the use of certified Electronic Health Records (EHRs) to address critical child health issues and generate new knowledge to improve pediatric practice.  This multi-million dollar network is funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). For more information, see The Pediatric Electronic Health Record Network and MCH Research.

Life Course Health Development (LCHD) Research Network
The Life Course Health Development Research Network advances public health research on the epidemiology, social determinants, origins and impacts of health disparities, from a life course theoretical framework and provides national leadership for this emerging field.  The life course health development approach provides an innovative integration of developmental, social equity, and health determinant models into a new synthesis that can powerfully address persistent and vexing maternal and child health problems.  The LCHD Research Network is a partnership between the MCH Research Program and the University of California Los Angeles. See  also The Life Course Health Development Research Network and MCH Research.

Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics Research Network (DBPNet)
The Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics Research Network is a multi-center scientific and clinical research network that promotes coordinated research activities and addresses health issues for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other developmental disabilities.  In addition, the DBPNet fosters a learning environment that provides training to a new generation of developmental behavioral pediatric researchers through mentorship, which is consistent with the HRSA mission to develop a strong health workforce. For more information, see The Developmental Behavioral Pediatrics Research Network and MCH Research.

MCH Services Block Grant
The mission of the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Block Grant Program, as authorized under Title V of the Social Security Act, is to improve the health of all mothers, children, and their families. These legislated responsibilities reduce health disparities, improve access to health care, and improve the quality of health care. Specifically the program seeks to: (1) assure access to quality care, especially for those with low-incomes or limited availability of care; (2) reduce infant mortality; (3) provide and ensure access to comprehensive prenatal and postnatal care to women (especially low-income and at risk pregnant women); (4) increase the number of children receiving health assessments and follow-up diagnostic and treatment services; (5) provide and ensure access to preventive and child care services as well as rehabilitative services for certain children; (6) implement family-centered, community-based, system of coordinated care for children with special health care needs (CSHCN); and (7) provide toll-free hotline and assistance in applying for services to pregnant women with infants and children who are eligible for Title V XIX (Medicaid).  The e MCH Block Grant is at its core a public health program that reaches across economic lines to improve the health of all mothers and children. Created as a partnership with State MCH programs and with broad State discretion, State Title V programs use appropriated formula grant funds for: capacity and systems building, public information and education, knowledge development, outreach and program linkage, technical assistance, provider training, evaluation, and direct and enabling services for women, children, adolescent and children with special health care needs across the nation. For more information see the Block Grant Program.

Medical Home
The family/patient centered medical home (F/PCMH) is a team based approach to care that promotes coordinated acute, preventive, and chronic care for all life stages.  In a F/PCMH, the clinical team partners with the patient/family to assure that all of the medical and non-medical needs of the patient are met.  The purpose of the MCHB F/PCMH initiative is to provide support to ongoing efforts to improve the lives of  children and youths, particularly those with special health care needs, access to a regular, ongoing source of health care in the community with appropriate sources of routine and specialty health care and the integration of medical services with the requisite community services. Effective efforts to ensure access to quality, community-based, comprehensive, continuous, coordinated, and culturally effective primary and specialty care are to be maintained through: 1) collaborative partnerships between State Title V/CSHCN programs,  health care professionals, health professional organizations, insurers/third party payers, community service providers, children and youth with special health care needs, and their families to assure universal access to medical homes, as well as 2) support systems for the clinicians who serve children and youths. The F/PCMH is important for providing a framework for organizing systems of quality, cost efficient and effective care at both the practice and community level. For more information, see the Medical Home program.

Mental Health/Emotional Wellness
Emotional wellness is an important aspect of individual’s overall health and balance in life.  HRSA OWH has developed a series of tools entitled “Bright Futures for Women’s Health and Wellness (BFWHW)” to empower and encourage young women and adult women to feel their best by promoting positive self-esteem. The provider and community tools can also be used to foster healthy relationships and better communication between the provider and the community. For more information, please visit HRSA's Office of Women's Health.

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National Fetal and Infant Mortality Review
The National Fetal and Infant Mortality (FIMR) Resource Center has received funding from MCHB since 1990 to provide technical assistance to states and communities, and to promote the use of the FIMR process.  FIMR is a community based action method that examines a fetal or infant death, and mobilizes community action to improve services and resource to women, infants, and their families. The program serves Women, Men, Infants and Adolescents and provides technical assistance to states and communities on the use of FIMR processes. FIMR is used as a form to discuss the causes of infant death, address service gaps and mobilize community members to raise awareness and increase preventative measures.  

National Maternal and Child Oral Health Policy Center 
The National Maternal and Child Oral Health Policy Center promotes the understanding of effective policy options to address ongoing disparities in children’s oral health. The three-year initiative, funded through MCHB, has set out to map a course for improving family oral health by building knowledge and skills of professionals with the ability to help direct systems changes. As a collaborative effort of key stakeholders, the Policy Center focuses effort on: 1. Building capacity to address issues and bring new information for policymakers and key stakeholders to improve MCH oral health policies and practices;  2. Building awareness, skills, and knowledge among policymakers and key stakeholders to actively promote new and effective oral health policies; and 3. Expanding and diversifying the audience engaged in promoting the oral health of MCH populations. For more information, see The National Maternal and Child Oral Health Policy Center.

National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs
The National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs has been conducted every four years since 2001.  With a sample size of about 40,000 children it provides national and state-level estimates for children with special health care needs (CSHCN). The survey collects information on topics such as functional ability, experiences with the health care system, impact of the child’s condition on the family, medical home, and specific chronic conditions.

Needs Assessment
The Title V Maternal & Child Health Block Grant Program Needs Assessment addresses the following: While many of the problems faced by the maternal and child health population (which includes mothers, women, children, adolescents, children and youth with special health care needs and their families) throughout the country are the same, each State and jurisdiction faces unique challenges. As a Federal-State partnership, Title V acknowledges the uniqueness of each State and jurisdictional maternal and child health program and the differing needs of their individual populations. State and jurisdictional Maternal and Child Health programs are best positioned to assess the needs of the population they serve, to design programs that address their specific needs, and to evaluate the success of their program efforts in meeting these needs. The Title V Federal-State partnership seeks to blend the needs of the Nation’s maternal and child health population as a group with the unique needs of mothers, women, children, adolescents, children and youth with special health care needs, and families who live in different States. For more information, see the Needs Assessment program.

Newborn Screening
HRSA/MCHB newborn screening initiatives help support State newborn screening and genetics programs, integrate newborn and genetic screening programs with other community services and medical homes, and strengthen existing newborn and genetic screening and service programs. All States and Washington, DC have newborn screening programs. These programs help integrate genetics into public health and population health. For more information, see the Newborn Screening program.

Nutrition
See "Healthy Child Care America" and Bright Futures for Women’s Health and Wellness.

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Office of Women's Health
See Women's Health.

Oral Health
See Oral Health and also Targeted MCH Oral Health Service Systems, National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Partnership for State Oral Health Leadership, School-Based Comprehensive Oral Health Services, MCH Pediatric Dentistry Training Programs, National Support for TitleV / Maternal and Child Health Oral Services and Healthy Child Care America 

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Partnerships with State Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
Medicaid, Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and Title V of the Social Security Act (SSA) are programs that serve many low-income women and children including children with special health care needs. Medicaid and CHIP are public insurance programs that provide medical assistance to enrollees that meet eligibility requirements. Title V is a block grant program, administered by the Health Resources Services Administration’s Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB) and combines Federal, State, and local funds to provide comprehensive services to low income women and children with limited access to health care services. For more information, see Partnerships.

Partnership for State Oral Health Leadership
The purpose of this cooperative agreement program is to support national membership organizations to provide direction to the organization’s leadership and members to assist in the development and implementation of state and local comprehensive oral health care programs and policies that are creative, collaborative and sustainable. Using a systems focus approach, each partner will improve a component of oral health systems of care for women and children, especially as it relates to impacting access to the delivery of services. These focused efforts include: 1.) Building capacity to train medical students in oral health; and 2.) Representing state oral health programs and oral health financing of state Medicaid and CHIPRA programs. This program will be expanded, beginning in September 2011, to add partners able to address systems improvements through; 1.) Safety net programs; 2.) Foundations; and 3.) State leadership.   Ultimately, the goal of this cooperative agreement program is to develop effective strategies that focus on innovative and effective fundamental approaches to prevention, diagnosis, early intervention and treatment of oral disease, including the financing of services.  Proposed projects are structured in a manner that offers the opportunity for collaboration among all awardees.

Pediatric Pulmonary Centers
The MCH Pediatric Pulmonary Centers (PPC) prepares health professionals to develop or improve community based, family-centered health care for children with chronic respiratory conditions.  PPCs provide interdisciplinary training of health professionals at the graduate and post graduate levels as well as work with State and local health agencies and providers in a wide geographic area.  The centers are expected to be models of excellence in training, service, and research related to chronic respiratory conditions in infants, children, and youth.

Perinatal Depression
All Healthy Start projects are required to screen for perinatal depression and refer those identified with depression for mental health services.The purpose of the Healthy Start(HS) perinatal depression screening is to prevent or reduce depression among HS participants. In addition, the DHSPS has developed a consumer booklet in Spanish and English titled Depression During or Around the Time of Pregnancy. The purpose of the Healthy Start(HS) perinatal depression screening is to prevent or reduce depression among HS participants. In addition, the DHSPS has developed a consumer booklet in Spanish and English titled Depression During or Around the Time of Pregnancy. Up to 80 percent of perinatal women will experience the "baby blues" while up to 20 percent will experience perinatal depression. Depression can be diagnosed and successfully treated which improves the health of the mother, her infant, and her family. For more information, see Depression During and After Pregnancy: A Resource for Women, Their Families, and Friends.

Perinatal Health
See "Healthy Start Programs"

Physical Activity and Healthy Eating
Physical activity and healthy eating are critical components to overall health.  HRSA’s Office of Women’s Health has developed a series of evidence-based educational tools around physical activity and healthy eating for adolescent girls and adult women, providers and communities, as part of the Bright Futures for Women’s Health and Wellness initiative.  The initiative supports increased use of preventive health services to women throughout the lifespan and shared patient-provider decision-making. For more information, visit HRSA's Office of Women's Health.

Pregnancy-Related Care Research Network 
The Pregnancy-Related Care Research Network is the only existing national collective of practicing obstetrician-gynecologists who conduct research on critical topics related to women’s health. The Network was established over 20 years ago as a partnership between the MCH Research Program and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). For more information, see Pregnancy-Related Care Research Network and MCH Research

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Research Programs
See MCH Research

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Safety Promotion and Injury & Violence Prevention
The Safety Promotion and Injury & Violence Prevention programs serves the state and local MCH organizations, related public health, education, and safety organizations, and other youth-serving professionals and administrators with injury and violence prevention. Its goal is to improve infant, child and adolescent health and safety service and systems through two cooperative agreements. The Children’s Safety Network National Resource Center assists states and localities to plan, implement, strengthen and evaluate injury and violence prevention programs that will improve health services delivery and risk reduction, as well as public health and safety. The MCH National Child Death Review Policy and Resource Center improves and strengthens State and local capacity to perform Child Death Reviews and to use information from those reviews to improve child and adolescent health services and systems and, ultimately, the health status of children and adolescents. Injuries are the leading public health threat facing people aged 1-44 years today.  More children and adolescents die from injuries and violence than all diseases combined, and injuries are the leading cause of disability. Through their work in safety promotion, the programs help protect infants, children, adolescents and families from this threat.

School-Based Comprehensive Oral Health Services (SBCOHS)
The Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Secretary, has selected a proposal to pilot the integration of comprehensive oral health services into school-based health centers in September 2011 (yet to be announced). Through the SBCOHS grant program, comprehensive oral health services will be brought into existing school-based health centers to decrease oral health disparities among children and adolescents from low-income families. MCHB-funded SBCOHS projects will demonstrate effective ways to strengthen existing school-based health center capacity to respond to the dental needs of young people and increase oral health access to services for underserved, high-risk populations. A strong SBCOHS program will prove to meet a current need, fulfill this need with a well-planned program that is grounded in collaboration among relevant stakeholders, and include an evaluation component with continuous quality improvement and an eye toward sustainability.

Schools of Public Health
Prepares students for careers in maternal and child public health practice, research, planning, policy development, and advocacy. Programs emphasize leadership training, applied research, and technical assistance to communities, states, and regions. For more information, see MCH Training.

Sickle Cell Disease
The Sickle Cell Disease programs serve individuals across the life span affected by and living with sickle cell disease or who are carriers of the sickle cell gene mutation. The program has established coordinated, comprehensive and family-centered networks to promote the integration of primary and subspecialty health care within medical homes for persons with sickle cell conditions. The networks enhance clinical and social support follow-up services as well as support their families.  Program activities also focus on health promotion, education and training and the improvement of treatment of sickle cell disease throughout an individual’s life course. For more information, see Sickle Cell Disease programs.

Social Work
Social Work.  Establishes MCH Centers of Excellence that promote public health training for social workers. Masters and doctoral training are supported. Also, these centers offer continuing education and educational materials to other social work programs across the nation. For more information, see MCH Training.

State Early Childhood Comprehensive Systems  (SECCS)
The State Early childhood Comprehensive Systems Program assures that services to young children are comprehensive by identifying service system gaps, and collaborating and partnering with potential early childhood service providers. The program  funds  state Title V staff and their partners for the development of a comprehensive state wide early childhood system of services for young children.

State Implementation Grants for Systems of Services for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs
State Implementation Grants for Systems of Services for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs improves access to a quality, comprehensive, coordinated community-based system of services for CYSHCN and their families that is family-centered and culturally competent.  For more information, see State Implementation Grants for Systems of Services for Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs.

State Systems Development Initiative (SSDI) 
SSDI launched in 1993 and supports State efforts to provide complete data for the Title V Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Needs Assessment and performance/outcome measures in the MCH Block Grant Application and Annual Report. This initiative complements the MCH Block Grant by emphasizing development and implementation of service and information systems at the state and community level to meet the preventive, primary, and special health care needs of all children and families. For more information, see the State Systems Development Initiative.

Stop Bullying
Stop Bullying Now! serves children, families, schools, community based organizations, and professionals who work with children and adolescents. The campaign raises awareness of the consequences of bullying and provides tools for parents, professionals and youth to prevent bullying. 

Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID) Center Consortium
The Consortium is comprised of the Resource Center, the Program Support Center, Project IMPACT and a project within the National Center for Cultural Competence. This consortium serves a diverse audience: researchers; non-profit, community-based prevention programs; families; and local, state, regional and national sudden unexpected infant death (SUID) prevention program staff. The consortium’s goal is to reduce sudden infant deaths and assist bereaved families. Each year about 4,600 U.S. infants die suddenly of no immediately obvious cause. As the third leading cause of infant death in the United States and the first leading cause of death among infants aged 1–12 months, efforts to prevent this public health problem are critical.

Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID) / Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)
Each year in the United States, more than 4,500 infants die suddenly of no immediately, obvious cause. Half of these Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID) are due to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), the leading cause of SUID and of all deaths among infants aged 1–12 months. See National SUID/SIDS Resource Center.

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Targeted MCH Oral Health Service Systems (TOHSS)
In the last year of funding with its project period ending in August 2010, the TOHSS grant program has helped twenty states build upon past efforts to develop, implement or otherwise strengthen the state’s oral health program infrastructure by targeting efforts to increase access to oral health services, especially for those most vulnerable children and their families. Three targeted areas for oral health collaboration included:  1) Age one dental visits for those children most at risk for disease, 2) Oral health access improvements for children with special health care needs, and 3) Follow-up restorative treatment of active disease identified through school-based sealant programs.

Teen Dating Violence
Tweens and teens are experiencing disturbing levels of violence in their dating relationships, but only half recognize the warning signs of a dangerous relationship. (http://www.atg.wa.gov/ProtectingYouth/TeenDatingViolence.aspx ).  HRSA OWH in collaboration with MCHB, Administration for Children and Families, and the Family Violence Prevention Fund continues to raise awareness around the impact of teen dating violence in the community and to promote healthy teen relationships through a series of webinars and meetings.   For more information , see the Washington State Attorney General's Teen Dating Violence page,  and the HHS Administration for Children & Families' Family Violence Prevention and Services.

Text 4 Baby
Text4baby is a free text messaging service, in English and Spanish,that provides pregnant women and new moms with information to help them care for their health and give their babies the best possible start in life. It is a partnership with the National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition and other Federal and non-Federal partners. Over 150,000 individuals have signed up for the service since February 2010. The goal is to reach 1 million moms by the end of 2012. For more information, see Text4baby.

Thalassemia 
The Thalassemia Program serves projects that implement a system of comprehensive care and medical management for individuals and families at risk or affected for thalassemia. Services range from screening, diagnosis, counseling, and psychosocial services to specialized medical care. The purpose of the program is to demonstrate a model system of comprehensive care and medical management with partners that include community-based organizations, adult and pediatric hematologists, primary care professionals, families, along with State and county health offices.  The program is important to support quality care, education and transitions across the life span for all affected individuals.

Title V Block Grants to States
Enacted in 1935 as a part of the Social Security Act, the Title V Maternal and Child Health Program is the Nation’s oldest Federal-State partnership. For over 75 years, the Federal Title V Maternal and Child Health program has provided a foundation for ensuring the health of the Nation’s mothers, women, children and youth, including children and youth with special health care needs, and their families. Title V converted to a Block Grant Program in 1981. For more information, see the Title V Block Grants program.

Training
MCHB invests in lifelong learning, from pipeline programs to encourage high school and college students to enter MCH professions to continuing education for practicing MCH professionals. For more information, see MCH Training.

Training and Education in Genetics
Training and education in genetics for maternal and child health (MCH) health professionals initiatives support programs for MCH practitioners in all health and public health professions.

Advances in genetics help improve scientific understanding of diseases, and present the challenge of incorporating this information and technology into MCH health care and public health practices. Therefore, ensuring that MCH health care and public health practitioners are aware of how advances in genetics affect health promotion, disease prevention, diagnosis, and management for the MCH population is imperative.

Learn more about the MCH Genetics Services Programs.

Training Programs

Adolescent Health – The MCH Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH) Training Program prepares professionals from a variety of health care disciplines to be leaders in clinical care, research, public health policy, and advocacy as it relates to adolescent health.  Training is designed to integrate biological, developmental, mental health, social, economic, and environmental issues within a public health framework with the goal of improving family- and youth-centered, community-based care for adolescents and enhancing the capacity of Title V programs to improve young people's health. For more information, see MCH Training.

Autism MCHB – supports the Combating Autism Act Initiative (CAAI), which includes investments in autism intervention research, interdisciplinary training in evidence based practice, and state demonstration grants.  The goal of all the programs is to improve the health of children, youth and adults who have Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), or are at risk for, neurodevelopmental or related disabilities by: increasing awareness of ASD; reducing barriers to screening and diagnosis; promoting evidence based interventions; promoting guideline development for interventions; and, training professionals to utilize valid screening tools to diagnose and to provide evidence based interventions.  For more information, see Combating Autism.

Communication Disorders – The MCH Communication Disorders Training Programs train speech-language pathologists and audiologists to provide comprehensive services to children and their families, and promotes the advancement of the field through information and knowledge dissemination.  Training focuses on leadership in communication disorders through: graduate training of speech/language pathologists and audiologists for leadership roles in education, service, research, academia, administration, and advocacy; development and dissemination of curricula, teaching models, and other educational resources to enhance MCH content in communication disorders training programs; and, continuing education, consultation and technical assistance geared to the needs of the MCH community. For more information, see MCH Training.

Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics – Enhances the behavioral, psychosocial, and developmental aspects of general pediatric care. The programs support fellows in behavioral pediatrics to help prepare them for leadership roles as teachers, researchers, and clinicians. For more information, see MCH Training.

Distance Education – The MCH Training Program distance education efforts enhance the reach of traditional continuing education offerings through videoconferencing, satellite linkages and the web.  MCH funded Distance Learning grants provide effective and efficient means by which maternal and child health (MCH) professionals can enhance and advance their analytical, managerial, administrative, and clinical skills while continuing to meet their daily on-site responsibilities. Projects provide continuing education on diverse MCH topics to a regional and/or national audience. For more information, see MCH Training.

Genetics Training – Training and education in newborn screening and genetics for maternal and child health professionals initiatives are supported by the Genetic Services Branch and administered by the Division of Services for Children with Special Health Needs, which is part of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau. For more information, see Genetics Training.

Leadership Education in Neurodevelopment and Related Disabilities (LEND) – Trains future leaders in a variety of disciplines to improve the health of children who have or are at risk of developing neurodevelopmental disabilities or other similar conditions such as autism and intellectual disabilities. For more information, see MCH Training.

MCH Public Health Leadership Institute – The MCH Public Health Leadership Institute provides training to increase the leadership skills of key management personnel in State Title V Maternal and Child Health and Children with Special Health Care Needs programs in the U.S.  This executive-education program is designed to quickly build practical skills for effectively leading, managing people, and building partnerships, to advocate for and create the MCH systems of tomorrow. For more information, see the MCH Public Health Leadership Institute.

MCH Certificate Programs – MCH supports two MCH Certificate programs which help key State Title V personnel and partners to facilitate timely transfer of new information, research findings, and technology related to MCH; and update and improve the knowledge and skills of health and related professionals in programs serving mothers and children. These programs support the conduct of short-term, non-degree related courses, symposia, institutes, and distance learning strategies for the MCH population. For more information, see MCH Training.

MCH Pipeline – The MCH Pipeline Programs promote the development of a culturally diverse and representative health care workforce by recruiting, training, and retaining students from under-represented groups into maternal and child public health professions.  MCH Pipeline programs recruit financially disadvantaged, under-represented undergraduate students and provides enriching experiences to increase students’ interests in MCH public health professions. For more information, see MCH Training.

Nursing – The Leadership Education in MCH Nursing Training Programs provide graduate training to prepare MCH nursing leaders for key positions in education, service, research, administration, and advocacy, and to assure MCH nursing leadership in caring for the MCH population. In addition to long term graduate training, these nursing programs serve as regional and national resources by conducting MCH research, providing continuing education, and providing technical assistance and consultation to the nursing field and a variety of other health care disciplines. For more information, see MCH Training.  

Nutrition – The MCH Leadership Education in Nutrition Training Programs establish and enhance centers of excellence to improve MCH by promoting the healthy nutrition of the mother, child, and family. MCH Nutrition Training Programs train leaders in the development and promotion of innovative practice models in MCH nutrition and work closely with other Title V programs to provide training and to develop MCH-related programs that promote public health nutrition for children.

Oral Health – The MCH Pediatric Dentistry Training Programs provide postdoctoral training for pediatric dentists designed to foster leadership in administration, education, public health, and oral health services. Specific training and service experiences are devoted to children with special health care needs, including children with behavioral problems.   Through the MCH Pediatric Dentistry Training Program, dentists receive specialized training in prevention and treatment services for the pediatric population and in dental public health and leadership. For more information, see MCH Training.

Schools of Public Health – Prepares students for careers in maternal and child public health practice, research, planning, policy development, and advocacy. Programs emphasize leadership training, applied research, and technical assistance to communities, states, and regions. For more information, see MCH Training.

Social Work – Establishes MCH Centers of Excellence that promote public health training for social workers. Masters and doctoral training are supported. Also, these centers offer continuing education and educational materials to other social work programs across the nation. For more information, see MCH Training.

Workforce Development – Taken together, all of the MCH Training Program investments are designed to prepare and support a diverse MCH workforce that is culturally competent and family centered and moves beyond excellent clinical practice or public health practice to leadership, through research, teaching, administration, and advocacy.  Graduates of MCH Leadership training programs improve the system of care for women, mothers, and children and engage families, youth, and communities in the development and ongoing implementation of training programs for the MCH workforce. For more information, see MCH Training.  

Transition from Pediatric to Adult Healthcare
Health care transition (HCT), moving from pediatric to adult care, for youth and adolescents, particularly those with special health care needs. is best encompassed in the patient- and family -centered medical home model of care and necessitates a team approach for success.  The Health Care Transition program supports statewide implementation grants and a National Health Care Transition Center (NHCTC)  to: 1) promote readiness of youth, family/caregivers, and pediatric and adult clinicians for HCT; 2) identify evidence-based practices and innovative strategies and tools to support effective HCT; and 3) encourage practice and system changes that facilitate successful HCT outcomes.  Specifically, the NHCTC provides information, tools, resources and connections to adolescent health and transition expertise nationwide through information dissemination, and technical assistance. It assists health professionals, policy makers, youth and adolescents with special health care needs and their families to understand how they can work together to change systems which better prepare youth and adolescents to make the transition to adulthood, including moving from the pediatric to the adult health care system; from secondary to post-secondary education; and to employment and self-sufficiency.  It also assists programs in supporting youth and adolescent participation in systems activities, such as youth councils, and in training youth and adolescents to be partners in their own care to make more informed decisions and in building systems more inclusive of and appropriate for transitioning youth and young adults. For more information, see National Health Care Transition Center, www.gottransition.orgexit disclaimer

Traumatic Brain Injury
On average, 1.7 million Americans incur a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) each year, and up to 90,000 of these individuals will continue to experience long-term, sometimes lifelong, impairments and disability as a result of a brain injury. The purpose of the TBI Program is to support States and Territories in their efforts to ensure individuals with TBI and their families will have accessible, available, acceptable, and appropriate services and supports to facilitate recovery and maximize independence. As TBI affects individuals across the age spectrum, the TBI Program is important because it has the potential to impact service delivery for individuals with TBI of all age groups and to offer support for their families. For more information, see the Traumatic Brain Injury program.

TXT4Tots
TXT4Tots is a library of short, evidence-based messages in English and Spanish based on Bright Futures guidelines. Messages are targeted to parents and caregivers of children between 1 and 5 years old and focus on nutrition and physical activity.

U

Universal Newborn Hearing Screening
The Universal Newborn Hearing Screening program, as indicated in the program name, serves all newborns in the United States and its Territories. The purpose of this program is to ensure that all newborns are screened for hearing impairment, preferably prior to hospital discharge and to improve the loss to documentation/loss to follow-up by utilizing specific interventions to achieve measurable improvement in the numbers of infants who receive appropriate and timely follow-up.  This program is important because if left undetected, hearing impairments in infants can negatively impact speech and language acquisition, academic achievement, and social and emotional development.  Research has shown that infants who fail newborn screening , are confirmed to have a hearing loss as early as possible (but before 3 months of age), and are entered in a program of early intervention services before 6 months of age will have language skills commensurate with their hearing peers at age 3 years.

V

Violence Prevention
See Teen Dating Violence and Stop Bullying.

Vision Screening
The Vision Screening program is to supports the public health role in assuring a continuum of eye care for young children within the healthcare delivery system.  ISB accomplishes this by funding the National Center for Children’s Vision and Eye Health.  This national center addresses the screening and follow-up component of that continuum by:  1) Providing national leadership in the development of the statewide vision screening and intervention component of programs for all children four years of age, prior to school entry,  2) Developing and implementing a plan for assisting states to coordinate existing vision screening activities within the state,  3) Working closely with 3-5 states to develop and implement a uniform statewide strategy for universal vision screening by age four, 4) determining a mechanism for uniform data collection and reporting; and 5) establishing a state Title V performance measure for vision screening.  As there is no system for universal vision screening in the United States, this program is imperative in obtaining a consensus on data, guidelines, screening mechanisms from providers, experts and families in order to strive for a universal system. For more information, see the Vision Screening program.  

W

Women's Health USA Databook
Women’s Health USA Databook is an annual reference publication summarizing key statistics on health indicators by sex, race/ethnicity, and age, developed in partnership with  MCHB’s Division of Healthy Start and Perinatal, Services and the Office of Epidemiology, Policy and Evaluation. For more information, see the Women’s Health USA Databook.  

Women's Health
On March 16, 2010, the Affordable Care Act codified the establishment of HRSA’s Office of Women’s Health (HRSA OWH), one of six women’s health offices across the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). For more information, see  HRSA’s Office of Women’s Health.

Workforce Development
Taken together, all of the MCH Training Program investments are designed to prepare and support a diverse MCH workforce that is culturally competent and family centered and moves beyond excellent clinical practice or public health practice to leadership, through research, teaching, administration, and advocacy.  Graduates of MCH Leadership training programs improve the system of care for women, mothers, and children and engage families, youth, and communities in the development and ongoing implementation of training programs for the MCH workforce. For more information,see MCH Training.oral