To ease the transition to adult health care, providers can offer guidance to adolescents and their families about various aspects of their care. The survey asked parents of youth with special health care needs whether their children’s providers had discussed health insurance; the shift to adult health care providers, if needed; and the child’s changing health care needs as he or she approaches adulthood. Overall, the parents of 31.6 percent of youth with special health care needs reported that they received all the guidance they needed in these three areas, while an additional 14.1 percent reported that they did not need any anticipatory guidance. The parents of over half of youth with special health care needs reported that they did not get all the anticipatory guidance they needed.

Parents were most likely to report that their children’s providers had discussed their children’s changing health care needs; the parents of 44.4 percent of CSHCN did so. The shift to adult health care providers was much less common, reported by the parents of only 13.6 percent of CSHCN, but the majority reported that this discussion was not needed. (For just over one-third of children in this age group, parents reported that their providers treated both adults and children, so a discussion of the transition to adult providers was not necessary.) The parents of 23.4 percent of youth with special health care needs reported that their children’s providers discussed health insurance.

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