Maternal and Child Health Training Program

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Grantee Spotlight and Digital Stories

Photo of Gregory J. Redding, MDLEAH Grantee Spotlight

Rebecca Shlafer, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor within the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota and a former trainee of the Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH) program. Dr. Shlafer is involved in several innovative projects addressing the issue of parental incarceration. She serves as the Research Director for Isis Rising Exit Disclaimer, a rapidly expanding community-university partnership aimed at providing pregnancy and parenting support to incarcerated women. As a result of these efforts -- after systematically providing birth support -- the cesarean section rate decreased from 63% to 3%. Highlights of these projects have been featured on Kare 11 Exit Disclaimer, the UMN homepage Exit Disclaimer, and the Star Tribune. Exit Disclaimer

Dr. Shlafer also utilized her legislative advocacy training by testifying on behalf of a bill she and her colleagues co-wrote Exit Disclaimer, which aims to better address the pregnancy and childbirth needs of incarcerated women in Minnesota. As a result of the passage of this legislation, she was asked to lead a new Legislative Advisory Committee on the reproductive health of incarcerated women.

In addition, Dr. Shlafer recently partnered with Sesame Street, using their resources for the initiative: Little Children, Big Challenges: Incarceration Exit Disclaimer, which was announced last June at the White House Exit Disclaimer. Her trip to the White House earned her another invitation in September, where she was asked to talk about mentoring children impacted by incarceration. Since then, she has helped lead the state-wide dissemination of these resources to community-based organizations, correctional facilities, schools, clinics, and families designed to support children with incarcerated parents. As part of this project, her team is also piloting an intervention with the resources in a multi-site, randomized control trial in two jails in Minnesota and two jails in Wisconsin. A separate, but related project Dr. Shlafer is working on is examining children and adolescents’ experiences visiting their jailed parents, through systematic observations of the parent-child visits at the correctional facility. Last month, her team received a proclamation from Governor Dayton. Exit Disclaimer

Dr. Shlafer’s reflections on LEAH Training:

For me, the highlight of being a LEAH fellow was the interdisciplinary training. I came to the MN LEAH program with a PhD in child psychology and without any experience working directly with physicians, social workers, nurses, or public health professionals. The LEAH program gave me the skills to learn to work within and across disciplines to improve the lives of youth impacted by a parent's incarceration. I use my LEAH training in life course and social determinants of health every day as I work to solve the complex challenges facing children and families affected by incarceration. I frequently find myself reflecting on the communication, media, and advocacy trainings I received as a LEAH fellow. Such trainings have helped me craft my messages to local reporters, legislators, MCH professionals, and other scholars. Now, as a member of the training faculty, I find it so rewarding to work with new LEAH fellows who are passionate about addressing critical public health issues.


Photo of Gregory J. Redding, MDSpotlight on Gregory J. Redding, MD

Pediatric Pulmonary Center grantee Gregory J. Redding, MD, is the 2015 recipient of the Edwin L. Kendig Award for lifetime achievements in the field of pediatric pulmonary medicine. This award is sponsored by the American Academy of Pediatrics every other year. The award is presented to an individual for distinguished clinical service and dedication to patient care, significant contributions to clinical or basic pediatric pulmonary research, and dedication to the education of pediatric pulmonary fellows, pediatric residents, and other trainees in the health professions. He is chief of the Division of Pulmonary Medicine at Seattle Children’s Hospital and Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He is also the Project Director of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau’s (MCHB’s) Pediatric Pulmonary Leadership Training Center at the University of Washington.

Dr. Redding has served in leadership positions for national professional organizations, lectured nationally and internationally, and participated in planning and evaluation of training for MCHB. He has published more than 150 original research articles and reviews and currently studies the health of indigenous children in the U.S. and abroad. He has received multiple teaching awards at the University of Washington and has been one of America’s Top Doctors for more than a decade.

Dr. Redding created the Pediatric Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine Division at Seattle Children’s Hospital and has provided regional pulmonary care in the Pacific Northwest for 34 years. He earned his medical degree at Stanford University School of Medicine. He completed his pediatric residency training at Harbor General Hospital/UCLA and his pulmonary fellowship at the University of Colorado.

The Division of MCH Workforce Development congratulates Dr. Redding on this well-deserved award!


University of Pittsburg LEND logo

Spotlight on LEND

Assessment of the impact of LEND training has been challenging for 2 reasons:  (1) NIRS data tracking LEND graduates over the long-term has been inconsistent and difficult to obtain for some programs; and (2) even when the NIRS Graduate Survey is completed, there is no comparison point.  The NIRS Graduate Survey is currently used post-training at 1, 5, and 10 years and graduates are asked to fill out 14 brief questions.  The aim of this short-term project at the Pittsburgh LEND is two-fold:  (1) to develop a methodology to ensure high retention rates among core LEND long term trainees with the NIRS Graduate Survey, and (2) establish a matching design with comparison peers who are not receiving LEND training.  For each of Pittsburgh’s core LEND long term trainees, a classmate from their graduate program will be recruited.  Comparison classmates will be selected on the basis of (in priority): a) same program of study; b) interest in children/pediatrics; c) same gender; d) same starting year in the program; and e) same race.  The project is a pilot feasibility trial that has been approved by the local IRB and requires informed consent from LEND trainees and comparison peers.


Photo of Pamela C. High, MD

Pamela C. High, MD


Brown University Logo Brown University

 

Brown University Logo

HASBRO CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

 

Download a PDF of article from Pediatrics

Spotlight on Dr. Pamela C. High, Project Director for the DBP program at Brown University and lead author of the new American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement “Literacy Promotion: An Essential Component of Primary Care Pediatric Practice”

Pamela C. High, MD, is Professor of Pediatrics at the Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, RI. She directs the Division of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics (DBP) at Hasbro Children’s/Rhode Island Hospital where she serves as the Program Director for fellowship training in DBP and for the HRSA/MCHB sponsored Brown Leadership Education in DBP Program. Dr. High is recent Past President of the Society of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics (SDBP) and member of the American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP’s) Early Brain and Child Development Leadership Workgroup. Her local advocacy efforts have included serving on RI’s Early Learning Council and on the boards of RI Kids Count and RI Reach Out and Read.

Dr. High is the lead author on the new Policy Statement from the AAP: “Literacy Promotion: An Essential Component of Primary Care Pediatric Practice.Exit Disclaimer The statement urges the 62,000 AAP members to talk to parents about how critical reading aloud is for fostering young children's brain development and building their early language and literacy skills. Pediatricians are also encouraged to provide books during health maintenance visits for all low-income, high-risk young children. The statement also calls for literacy promotion to be included in pediatric residency training, and for federal and state funding to help manage the costs of making age-appropriate books available in pediatric medical homes.

In a related article in the Huffington Post (6/30/2014) entitled, “Pediatricians Call For Parents To Read Aloud To Their Children Every Day” and interviews on the Public Broadcast Station (PBS) Exit Disclaimer, Dr. High, referring to parents, said they should remember the so-called "5 Rs" of early education: reading with their children daily as fun family activity; rhyming, singing and cuddling with them throughout the day; establishing routines and regular times for meals and sleep; rewarding them for their efforts and successes to boost self-esteem; and developing relationships that are reciprocal, enduring and nurturing which are the foundation of healthy development. "Pediatricians are taking a stand to spread the news more widely that early shared reading is both fun and ultimately very rewarding," Dr. High said.


group photo of CHALK team

Spotlight on Healthy Tomorrows Grantee: CHALK

Healthy Tomorrows Grantee's CHALK program (Choosing Healthy & Active Lifestyles for Kids) received national recognition by Michelle Obama through her Let's Move! Active Schools initiative. The American Academy of Pediatrics, Division of Community-based Initiatives newsletter, Community Pediatrics E-News, features an interview with CHALK project leaders Andrea Hausel, MPH, RD, CDN and Dodi Meyer, MD, FAAP.

Read more about the CHALK program... Exit Disclaimer


group photo of CHALK team

Honoring T. Berry Brazelton, MD and his work with DBP Fellows

T. Berry Brazelton, MD, Professor of Pediatrics Emeritus at Harvard Medical School, is one of the world’s foremost authorities on pediatrics and child development. Author of over 200 scholarly papers, he has written over 40 books on pediatrics, child development, and parenting. Translated into more than 20 languages, these include the now classic Infants and Mothers, and the bestselling Touchpoints series. His groundbreaking Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS) is now used... read more about Dr. Brazelton...


Photo of Dorothy Cilenti

Dorothy Cilenti, DrPH, MPH, MSW

Logo for UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health

MCH Workforce Development Center

Dorothy Cilenti is the Project Director of the new MCH Workforce Development Center, a cooperative agreement with Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of MCH Workforce Development. Dr. Cilenti is Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Maternal and Child Health and Administrator of the NC Local Health Department Accreditation Program at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health in Chapel Hill. Dorothy was previously the Local Health Director of Alamance and Chatham counties in North Carolina. She also served as Interim Health Director for the Orange County Health Department. Prior to working as a senior executive in local public health, she served as the Deputy Director of the NC Division of Public Health. She received her master’s in public health and social work from UNC-Chapel Hill in 1989. In 2009, she completed a doctoral program in Health Policy and Management at the Gillings School of Global Public Health.


Kennedy Krieger Institute
LEND Program

In recognition of national commitment to women, children and families, the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Training Programs of Maryland hosted a luncheon and seminar on October 22, 2010 to commemorate Title V and the Social Security Act, and to pay special tribute to the memory of Dr. Vince Hutchins.


 

John Hopkins University
School of Public Health Program

In recognition of national commitment to women, children and families, the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Training Programs of Maryland hosted a luncheon and seminar on October 22, 2010 to commemorate Title V and the Social Security Act, and to pay special tribute to the memory of Dr. Vince Hutchins.


University of Maryland, Baltimore
Social Work Program

In recognition of national commitment to women, children and families, the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Training Programs of Maryland hosted a luncheon and seminar on October 22, 2010 to commemorate Title V and the Social Security Act, and to pay special tribute to the memory of Dr. Vince Hutchins.


John Hopkins University
LEAH Program

In recognition of national commitment to women, children and families, the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Training Programs of Maryland hosted a luncheon and seminar on October 22, 2010 to commemorate Title V and the Social Security Act, and to pay special tribute to the memory of Dr. Vince Hutchins.


John Hopkins University
COR Program

In recognition of national commitment to women, children and families, the Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Training Programs of Maryland hosted a luncheon and seminar on October 22, 2010 to commemorate Title V and the Social Security Act, and to pay special tribute to the memory of Dr. Vince Hutchins.


Reflections From My DBP Fellowship Training

Neel Soares, MD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Kentucky, describes the rich educational experience provided by an innovated Developmental-Behavioral Pediatric Fellowship Program supported by the MCHB Training Program.


Meet the UF PPC Program

Meet the trainees and fellows of the University of Florida Pediatric Pulmonary Center MCH Training program. Their enthusiasm for training, clinical care and community involvement is truly inspiring. Watch this video. More on the UF PPC Funded Project.

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