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Women's Health USA 2013 An illustrated collection of current and historical data, published annually.

Cancer

Narrative

Cancer is the second leading cause of death among adults overall, and is the leading cause of death among women between the ages of 35 and 84.1 In 2010, 711,113 new cancer cases were diagnosed among females and 273,706 females died of cancer. Lung and bronchial cancer was the leading cause of cancer death among females, accounting for 70,550 deaths (26 percent of all cancer deaths), followed by breast cancer, which was responsible for 40,996 deaths (15 percent of deaths). Colorectal cancer, pancreatic cancer, and ovarian cancer were also major causes of cancer deaths among females, accounting for an additional 57,733 deaths combined.

Due to the varying survival rates for different types of cancer, the most common causes of death from cancer are not always the most common types of cancer. For instance, although lung and bronchial cancer causes the greatest number of deaths, breast cancer is more commonly diagnosed among females. In 2010, invasive breast cancer occurred among 118.7 per 100,000 females, whereas lung and bronchus cancer occurred in only 52.4 per 100,000. Other types of cancer that are commonly diagnosed but are not among the top 10 causes of cancer death include thyroid, melanoma, and cervical cancer.

An estimated 70 percent of cancer cases are attributable to behavioral and environmental risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, and physical inactivity.2 Vaccines are also available to help prevent hepatitis B and human papillomavirus (HPV) which can cause liver and cervical cancer, respectively. Recommended screening can help detect several forms of cancer in early, more treatable stages, including breast, colorectal, and cervical cancer, and is shown to reduce mortality.3

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention link leaves hrsa.gov site, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS): Leading Causes of Death. Accessed 07/06/13.

2 Colditz GA, Wei EK. Preventability of cancer: the relative contributions of biologic and social and physical environmental determinants of cancer mortality. Annu Rev Public Health. 2012;33:137-56.

3 American Cancer Society link leaves hrsa.gov site. Cancer Facts and Figures 2013. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2013. Accessed 06/23/13.

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Graphs

Data

Leading Causes of Cancer Deaths Among Females (All Ages), by Site, 2010

Number of Deaths:

  • Lung and Bronchus 70,550
  • Breast 40,996
  • Colon and Rectum 24,972
  • Pancreas 18,189
  • Ovary 14,572
  • Leukemia 9,761
  • Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma 9,247
  • Uterine Corpus 8,402
  • Liver and Intrahepatic Bile Duct 6,647
  • Brain and Other Nervous System 6,187

Source: American Cancer Society link leaves hrsa.gov site. Cancer Facts and Figures 2013. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2013. Accessed 06/23/13.

Age-Adjusted Invasive Cancer Incidence Rates per 100,000 Females (All Ages), by Site, 2010

Invasive Cancer Rate per 100,000 Females:

  • Breast 118.7
  • Lung and Bronchus 52.4
  • Colon and Rectum 35.4
  • Uterine Corpus 24.8
  • Thyroid 19.9
  • Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma 15.7
  • Melanoma 15.3
  • Ovary 11.4
  • Kidney 10.8
  • Pancreas 10.6

Source: American Cancer Society link leaves hrsa.gov site. Cancer Facts and Figures 2013. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2013. Accessed 06/23/13.