Rank of leading causes of death among women aged 65 and older, 2001 (table): Diseases of the heart: White, 1; Black, 1; Hispanic, 1; American Indian, 1; Asian/Pacific Islander, 1. Malignant neoplasms: White, 2; Black, 2; Hispanic, 2; American Indian, 2; Asian/Pacific Islander, 2. Cerebrovascular diseases: White, 3; Black, 3; Hispanic, 3; American Indian, 3; Asian/Pacific Islander, 3. Chronic lower respiratory diseases: White, 4; Black, 6; Hispanic, 6; American Indian, 5; Asian/Pacific Islander, 6. Alzheimer’s Disease: White, 5; Black, 9; Hispanic, 7; American Indian, 9; Asian/Pacific Islander, 10. Influenza and pneumonia: White, 6; Black, 7; Hispanic, 5; American Indian, 6; Asian/Pacific Islander, 5. Diabetes mellitus: White, 7; Black, 4; Hispanic, 4; American Indian, 4; Asian/Pacific Islander, 4. Nephritis, necrotic syndrome, and necrosis: White, 9; Black, 5; Hispanic, 8; American Indian, 8; Asian/Pacific Islander, 7. Unintentional injuries: White, 8; Black, not one of the ten leading causes; Hispanic, 9; American Indian, 7; Asian/Pacific Islander, 8. Septicemia: White, 10; Black, 8; Hispanic, 10; American Indian, not one of the ten leading causes; Asian/Pacific Islander, not one of the ten leading causes.

Source: Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics. Older Americans 2004: key indicators of well-being. Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics, November 2004.