HEALTH STATUS > HEALTH INDICATORS

INJURY

Although many injuries are preventable, there were an estimated 39 million injury-related emergency department (ED) visits in 2002. Overall, the rate of injury-related ED visits was higher among males than females (15.4 compared to 12.3 percent of visits per year). Among females, nearly one-third of injury-related ED visits were made by those aged 25 to 44 years, while fewer than 6 percent were made by women aged 65 to 74 years. However, the highest rate (18 per visits per 100 people) occurred among women 75 years and older (data not shown); among males, the highest rate (21 visits per 100 people) occurred among men aged 15 to 24 years.

Unintentional and intentional injuries represented a higher proportion of ED visits for males than females in 2002. Among males and females aged 18 years and older, unintentional injuries accounted for 27.6 and 19.3 percent of ED visits, respectively, while intentional injuries represented 2.9 and 1.6 percent of ED visits, respectively. Among both sexes, the two most common causes of injury were falls (6.1 percent of ED visits among females and males) and motor vehicle crashes (4.2 percent of ED visits among females and 5.1 percent of ED visits among males). Injuries accounted for a greater percentage of ED visits for males than females for every cause, with the exception of adverse medical effects; for that cause, the rate was 1.6 compared to 1.3 percent of ED visits for women and men respectively. Other common causes of injury among females included being accidentally struck by an object or person, cutting or piercing instruments or objects, and natural or environmental factors.

Graph: Injury Related Emergency Department Visits for Females by Age[d]

Graph: Injury Related Emergency Department Visits by Sex and Mechanism[d]