Safety in the Neighborhood

Families are more likely to feel comfortable in a neighborhood if they feel that their children are safe. Parents were asked how often they felt that their child was safe in their community or neighborhood—never, sometimes, usually, or always. Overall, parents of 86.6 percent of children report that they feel that their child is usually or always safe in their neighborhood.

Parents of non-Hispanic White children and non-Hispanic children of other races were more likely to report that their children are safe in their neighborhoods, compared to parents of children of other racial and ethnic groups. Over 93 percent of non-Hispanic White children were reported to be usually or always safe in their neighborhoods, as were 86.9 percent of non-Hispanic children of other races. In contrast, parents of 77.2 percent of Hispanic and 77.0 percent of non-Hispanic Black children felt that their children are usually or always safe in their neighborhoods.

Parents’ assessments of neighborhood safety vary by income as well. Of children with household incomes below the Federal poverty level (FPL), 74.3 percent were reported to be usually or always safe in their neighborhoods, compared to 83.5 percent of children with household incomes between 100 and 199 percent of the FPL. Of children with household incomes between 200 and 399 percent of FPL, 90.3 percent lived in safe neighborhoods, as did 95.1 percent of children with household incomes of 400 percent or more of FPL.